#Review of The Day After Roswell

#Readers and fans of #UFO, alien, and #ancientaliens theories will find this a very interesting book. Col. Philip J. Corso (Ret.) offers the story of what transpired (his facts) from the point of the “alien vehicle” crash near Roswell, NM in July 1947 up through the mid-1980’s.

There is tremendous detail of the U.S. Army and the Foreign Technology unit that the author worked within, as well as many tangents from that. At times, the timeline and narrative facts get lost in the tangents and self-congratulatory prose.

Sadly, other than his word, Corso does not present any tangible evidence (for the doubters). In fact, the U.S. Army purposely chose to hide the advanced technology harvested at the Roswell crash site by sending it to tech companies, such as Hughes and Bell Laboratories, whereby these companies incorporated the alien technology into their ongoing projects. Thus, the true source of their innovations was hidden forever. All of this was orchestrated by the Army’s Foreign Technology unit, which was run by the author in the early 1960’s.

Another peculiar aspect about Corso’s story comes in the form of strong statements that aliens were threatening the U.S., especially military installations, as well as Earth and its inhabitants. However, the only evidence offered is reference to cattle mutilations and human abductions, along with what sound like alien recon activities. (To my mind, if the aliens wanted to attack or destroy us, then wouldn’t they have done it by now, certainly with their superior technology, especially prior to 1960.)

Much of what he relates about aliens visiting Earth matches what I’ve seen from other credible sources-some secret.

One extremely interesting tidbit Corso relates pertains to the development of the transistor. For details on this:

http://rense.com/ufo/amcompgift.htm

or

http://beatriceco.com/bti/porticus/bell/belllabs_transistor1.html

Overall, I am glad I read the book. 4 Stars.

Pre-Holiday Rush Thriller Giveaway

Feeling lucky? Enter to win one of two signed copies of The Secret Keepers: www.goodreads.com/geoffreymgluckman
contest begins today (11 October)
#thrillers #readers #kindle

Goodreads Giveaway for The Secret Keepers

Enter your chance to win one of five first editions of the new #thriller, The Secret Keepers, by Geoffrey M. Gluckman: click here

Contest begins 2 February 2016 at midnight.

Valid for #readers in the U.S.

(Winners will be selected by #

sequel to Deadly Exchange
sequel to Deadly Exchange

Goodreads officials)

#Review of The Cairo Affair

#Readers of #thrillers, this stand alone novel by award-winning author Olen Steinhauer takes place a few months after the Arab Spring. An American embassy official is murdered in Budapest and may figure into a CIA plan to meddle in Libya’s growing revolution. The wife of the murdered official, Sophie Kohl, wants to know who killed him, despite not being the most faithful spouse. Sophie and four other characters, mostly in the intelligence circles of the U.S. and Egypt, each tell their version of the events leading up to the murder. Then, there is betrayal, the devilish element that runs rampant throughout the story, which makes it a character in and of itself. Presenting a story from different points of view makes it harder to follow, at times, but is entirely effective in spinning an intriguing espionage tale. Certainly in the vein of Graham Greene, but falls a little short. 3.5 Stars.

#Review of The Complete Sherlock Holmes

#Readers and lovers of #mysteries should certainly enjoy all the stories of the famed detective penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Most are narrated by Dr. Watson, the faithful sidekick of Sherlock, and provide insights to the detective’s methods of detection and resolution. I like the longer stories better, as they offer more character development, more action, and better plot points. My favorite story is The Hound of the Baskervilles, one of four “novels” that feature Holmes and Watson. 4 Stars.